Book Week 2019 across the ages

We are halfway into our Book Week 2019 celebrations and today’s feature is BIG – featuring 3 books across 3 age groups: 0-3 years, 3-5 years and 5-8 years. Keep reading to see what we like about these books through our speech pathology lens and our top reading tip for each book! Let’s do this!

1. It’s not scribble to me by Kate Ritchie (0-3 years)

CBCA Book of the Year: Early Childhood Notable, Speech Pathology Australia Book of the Year: 0-3 years Shortlisted

Cover of “It’s not scribble to me” (Kate Ritchie)

This book will engage little ones, whether they are artistic or not! Many parents and children alike will recognise aspects of this book in their own lives – from the parent who is frustrated at their child for drawing on the wall, to the child who is excited to draw, paint, colour all over the walls! The rhyme and rhythem of the language is highly appropriate for this age group while the pictures and words togeher allow opportunities for predictions and inferences. Each page is features a ‘child-drawn’ picture – sure to spark conversations during and long after reading and even inspire your child to draw their own unicorn or frog. You could easily share this book with older children and use language to compare and contrast how their drawing is same and/or different to the one in the book.

“It’s not scribble to me” (Kate Ritchie)

READING TIPS:
Pause to give your child a chance to ‘predict’ what the bear has drawn e.g. “It’s only a _____” (point as you pause), or “The black is a ____”.

2. Duck! by Meg McKinlay (3-5 years)

CBCA Book of the Year: Early Childhood Notable, Speech Pathology Australia Book of the Year: 3-5 years Shortlisted

Cover of “Duck!” (Meg McKinlay)

Duck runs around the farm shouting “DUCK!”, trying to warn them of something falling out of the sky, only to have the other animals exasperately explain why they are nothing like a duck. As speech pathologists, we love the descriptive language (“you have funny webbed feet and I have these fine cloven hooves”) and the moral of the story – to be a good communicator, you have use specific language! Nathaniel Eckstrom’s illustrations are captivating and changes in text type (bold, size, italics, font) encourage 3-5 year olds to explore print and understand how it affects how the story is read.

READING TIP: Make comments about how different character’s perspectives about the events, helping your child’s theory of mind to develop. For example, “Duck is beginning to feel frustrated because he feels the other animals are not listening to him but Sheep can’t understand why Duck would think to call him a ‘duck’.”

“Duck!” (Meg McKinlay)

3. Under the Southern Cross by Frané Lessac (5-8 years)

CBCA Eve Pownall Award: Notable, Speech Pathology Australia Book of the Year: 5-8 years Shortlisted

The older sister to Frané Lessac’s “A is for Australia”, this stunningly illustrated book represents all the beautiful elements of our diverse Australian cultural, geographical and social contexts. Educating this age group of readers through a larger-font introductory sentence of the location (e.g. “In Brisbane, the Ferris wheel spins up to the stars, for a sweeping view of the city – under the Southern Cross.”) and then drawing readers in deeper with facts that are embedded into the illustrations. The descriptive language creates a sense of wonder and excitement, sure to prompt many young ones to ask further questions, express that they have seen it before or make comparisons to where they live.

Cover of “Under the Southern Cross” (Frané Lessac)

READING TIP: Encourage your child to compare and contrast their own town/city to the ones described in the book. For example, “In Brisbane, we have a bridge too, called the Queen Victoria Bridge, just like how Sydney has the Sydney Harbour Bridge however, we do not have the Sydney Opera House.”

“Under the Southern Cross” (Frané Lessac)

We hope you enjoyed reading about these three celebrated books and taking on a new reading tip!

Our very own book boxes provide speech pathologist-approved books and play activities designed by us to encourage strong communication skills in your child.

Our Book Week 2019 special is running now – check out the SHOP page!

3 new books in August 2019

Is it really August already? So many new books have been published this month and we are excited to share our finds through a speech pathology lens. As speech pathologists, we are on the hunt for books with robust vocabulary, strong story structure, and captivating illustrations. As parents too, we want books to sound good when read aloud so that they can be enjoyed time and time again.

Here are our top 3 recommendations this month: Continue reading “3 new books in August 2019”

3 new books in July 2019

Which picture books have sparkled under our speech pathology lens this month? As you may know already, as speechies and mums, Tania and I look for books with robust vocabulary, strong story structure, captivating illustrations and to be frank, sound good when read aloud as picture books needs to be read aloud to young children and when they sound good, it is easier for parent and child to enjoy them time and time again.

So here’s a round-up of our top 3 this month: Continue reading “3 new books in July 2019”

3 new books in June 2019

As speech pathologists, we love books because they support conversation, turn taking skills and language development and we regularly use them to therapy. Our new series will highlight five picture books each month that we have chosen for their message, vocabulary, text features or illustrations that we believe you will enjoy reading with your kids at home! Continue reading “3 new books in June 2019”

Q&A with Jo Williamson

“Papa Penguin and Pippin run the best cafe in the Antarctic, serving fish for breakfast, fish for lunch, fish for dinner, and even… fish ice cream! Everyone loves fish. Or do they?” What’s for Lunch, Papa Penguin? takes a penguin chef on a chaotic roadtrip around the world in search of new exciting foods to try. It is one of the two books featured in our Cooking Kit book box, we are celebrating its release with this 5 question chat with the author and illustrator of this hilarious picture book, Jo Williamson. Enjoy!

Continue reading “Q&A with Jo Williamson”

Best Books about Bears

You might be thinking, “Haven’t you already selected the two best books about bears in your Bear Hug book box?” and the answer is “Yes, yes we have…” BUT we do have a few more up a sleeve that didn’t quite make the cut due to various reasons. We still think these books are great so we wanted to compile this post so if your kids are wanting more books about bears! Here are our top 5:

Continue reading “Best Books about Bears”