Talking Tips for the Late Talking Toddler

What do Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill have in common?

Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill were both late talkers. In fact, some say Einstein did not utter his first words until he was three.

‘Late talkers’ is a hot topic with mothers in the playground which is not surprising when they account for 15% of the toddler population!

Most well-meaning friends provide reassuring conclusions about:  how everyone develops at their own rate; a successful family member who didn’t talk till they were 5; they’re just ‘shy’; or a reference to a world famous late talker of genius status like ‘Albert Einstein’… and they were more than fine!

Your child might be like Einstein but just in case they aren’t… Tonight’s blog post provides parents with some practical tweaks to the way they communicate which will provide your child with the best platform for learning to talk. Continue reading “Talking Tips for the Late Talking Toddler”

4 year olds in the eyes of a speech pathologist

Four year olds are fascinating! A year that’s full of building on old skills while picking up brand-new ones at breakneck speed. Four is typically a lively, energetic, and sociable year. Confident about basics like speaking, running, drawing, and building things, your child is ready to use these skills to the fullest. Even more reserved  four year olds tend to enjoy the company of adults and children of all ages. Everybody seems fascinating now, from the postman to cousins to random new faces on the playground. But what do speech pathologist’s look for in a four year old? Continue reading “4 year olds in the eyes of a speech pathologist”

HELP! I think I’m a helicopter parent!

A little birdie once used the term ‘helicopter mum’ to describe a parenting style and the term stuck with me.  It was a term that picked away at my deepest insecurities; this was not how I wanted to be nor be described by others. 

Helicopter parent (n):  A primary caregiver who hovers (both literally and figuratively) over their offspring to the detriment of the child’s learning and independence.

  The term ‘helicopter parent’ has strong negative connotations with many associated terms springing to mind:  anxiousness, kids wrapped in cotton wool, control freaks, learnt helplessness, worry warts, and the list goes on.  It seems that the general consensus is that ‘helicopter parenting’ is not the way we should parent but the jury is out on the right way.

Continue reading “HELP! I think I’m a helicopter parent!”